1. A reduction in progression of myopia could mean a lower prescription giving better vision when not wearing glasses or contact lenses.

  2. For children who would go on to develop high levels of myopia (for example -6.00D or more) a reduction in progression of myopia could mean not only a lower prescription giving better vision when not wearing glasses or contact lenses but also a lower incidence of eye diseases associated with high myopia such as retinal detachment or glaucoma in later life¹.

Current Approach

  1. Current approaches to manage myopia progression include atropine, Ortho-K and bifocal or progressive addition (PAL) spectacle lenses.

  2. Atropine has been shown to slow down the rate of progression of myopia however it has side effects including photophobia and reduced accommodation as well as long term safety concerns².

  3. Ortho-K was originally developed to control refractive error however it is believed flattening the central cornea induces an effective peripheral power profile that may control eye growth. Disadvantages of Ortho-K include discomfort and increased risk of infections; it’s also complex requiring specific fitting and management skills³.

  4. Bifocal and PAL spectacles have been used to try and slow the rate of progression of myopia. Results have been variable and mixed perhaps due to non compliance in terms of ‘looking round’ the near zones of the lenses⁴.

  1. Saw, S. M., L. Tong, et al. (2005). Incidence and progression of myopia in Singaporean school children. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science 46(1): 51-57.

  2. Chua WH, Balakrishnan V, Chan YH, Tong L, Ling Y, Quah BL, Tan D. Ophthalmology. 2006 Dec;113(12):2285-91

  3. Cho, P., SW. Cheung, et al. (2005). Current Eye Research 30(1):71-80.

  4. Gwiazda J, Hyman L, Hussein M, Everett D, Norton TT, Kurtz D, Leske MC, Manny R, Marsh-Tootle W, Scheiman M. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2003 Apr;44(4):1492-500.